Jack–of–all–trades, including comet watcher

Credit: Observatoire de Haute-Provence & IMCCE

Whilst best known for its surveys of the stars and mapping the Milky Way in three dimensions, ESA’s Gaia has many more strings to its bow. Among them, its contribution to our understanding of the asteroids that litter the Solar System. Now, for the first time, Gaia is not only providing information crucial to understanding known asteroids, it has also started to look for new ones, previously unknown to astronomers.

Since it began scientific operations in 2014, Gaia has played an important role in understanding Solar System objects. This was never the main goal of Gaia – which is mapping about a billion stars, roughly 1% of the stellar population of our Galaxy – but it is a valuable side effect of its work. Gaia’s observations of known asteroids have already provided data used to characterise the orbits and physical properties of these rocky bodies more precisely than ever before.
“All of the asteroids we studied up until now were already known to the astronomy community,” explains Paolo Tanga, Planetary Scientist at Observatoire de la Côte d’Azur, France, responsible for the processing of Solar System observations. … (ESA)

Credit: Observatoire de Haute-Provence & IMCCE

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