Now is is what we call “Northern Lights”

credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/UCL/W.Dunn et al, Optical: NASA/STScI

Solar storms are triggering X-ray auroras on Jupiter that are about eight times brighter than normal over a large area of the planet and hundreds of times more energetic than Earth’s “northern lights,” according to a new study using data from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory. This result is the first time that Jupiter’s auroras have been studied in X-ray light when a giant solar storm arrived at the planet.

The Sun constantly ejects streams of particles into space in the solar wind. Sometimes, giant storms, known as coronal mass ejections (CMEs), erupt and the winds become much stronger. These events compress Jupiter’s magnetosphere, the region of space controlled by Jupiter’s magnetic field, shifting its boundary with the solar wind inward by more than a million miles. This new study found that the interaction at the boundary triggers the X-rays in Jupiter’s auroras, which cover an area bigger than the surface of the Earth. … (Chandra)

credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/UCL/W.Dunn et al, Optical: NASA/STScI

credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/UCL/W.Dunn et al, Optical: NASA/STScI

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