gravitational lens

Let’s look a̶t̶ with the Sun

Astronomers use several techniques to find exoplanets, including the so-called “gravitational microlensing” method. The light from a faraway star and its exoplanet is bent around another star located midway between Earth and the distant star/exoplanet,…


Just wait 12 years to look at Alpha Centauri

A very rare gravitational lensing event, set to occur in 2028, has been predicted by a team of French astronomers led by Pierre Kervella of the CNRS/Universidad de Chile. It will provide an ideal opportunity…


We are the 5% (of the universe)

In our standard model of cosmology, only five percent of the mass-energy budget of the Universe is accounted for by particles that have been detected in Earth-based laboratories. The remaining 95 percent, called dark matter…


Ring in the sky

One hundred years ago this month, Albert Einstein published his theory of general relativity, one of the most important scientific achievements in the last century. A key result of Einstein’s theory is that matter warps…


ALMA Looking around the corner

In 2014, ALMA’s Long Baseline Campaign, separated it’s antennas for up to 15 kilometers and produced a spectacularly detailed image of the distant, gravitationally lensed galaxy SDP.81 [1]. New analyses of this image reveal details…


Smiley in Space

In the centre of this image, taken with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, is the galaxy cluster SDSS J1038+4849 — and it seems to be smiling. You can make out its two orange eyes and…


Down memory Subaru Lane

The Subaru Telescope had its first light on Christmas 1998. Time has gone quickly; it is already more than 15 years since then. This image is a gravitationally lensed object observed in visible and infrared…